Is Microsoft Edge good enough for you to make the switch from Google Chrome?

Is Microsoft's new age web browser a viable candidate for your daily use?

It’s been a comfortable 3 years since Microsoft released the first version of it’s web browser: the Microsoft Edge. But in the time since, whether you’ve realized it or not, it’s gained a considerable following. It’s generally agreed upon that Edge is faster than the current most used web browser: Google Chrome. That’s a bold statement. We’ll look into that, but first of all, let’s look at what makes it better than it’s older brother: Internet Explorer.

Comparing Internet Explorer to Microsoft Edge is a nuanced way of comparing apples to oranges. The Edge is a complete revamp of the Explorer in every way imaginable. For one, the Explorer was notorious for being slower than every single web browser in existence. But the Edge has come to be known for a very well integrated and completely respectable browser for Windows. You can find a lot of benchmarks for the browsers involved at different places, but they don’t tell the real story.

Benchmarks generally give you all the details that don’t matter. In fact, the welcome page of Edge shows the “speed scores” for itself and its two main competitors. According to Microsoft, Chrome is 27% slower, and Firefox 51% slower. We’re not saying this isn’t true. We’re saying it doesn’t matter.

Speed scores don’t really translate well into real world browsing speeds. If you’re a web browsing purist, and you don’t use any browser extensions, Chrome is still the best. Add some extensions and Google Chrome will fall to its knees and start crawling. Chrome also comes with Adobe flash, which reflects in these “speed scores”.

What about real world browsing speeds? It really doesn’t make any difference if you don’t have any extensions to speak of. Back in the day, we wouldn’t even be having this conversation. The fact that the Edge gives Chrome a run for its money is an impressive feat in and of itself. What’s more baffling is that if you add some extensions, the Edge outperforms Chrome by a considerable degree.

So if you don’t plan on using extensions, Chrome is still the way to go. But if in case you do, then the Edge will give you a better experience. Chrome is ubiquitous, which still counts for something. We’re not saying that Chrome is the browser to end all other browsers; we’re just saying the Edge provides it some healthy competition. But in the end, that’s all that it is. Chrome still holds onto its throne comfortably.



  1. I tried to use Edge but I can’t stand the bookmark manager. I prefer Bookmark OS

  2. Hullo,
    Just a small note: “its” in the possesive form does not have an apostrophe. So, its “its”, not “it’s”. This is certainly one case where a spelling-checker us no use.
    There you go……

  3. Nobody should be switching to Edge. If you do not like Chrome use FF or any other browser. Edge is incredibly insecure and should be avoided.

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