A Kiwi born artist living Berlin has created a way to discover Glassholes and then cut off their WiFi, effectively neutering their ability to broadcast

“Google Glass not welcome.” While the words are easy to say, actually enforcing the intent can be difficult, to say the least. However, a Kiwi born artist living Berlin has created a way to discover Glassholes and then cut off their WiFi, effectively neutering their ability to broadcast.

A little bit of custom code running on a Raspberry Pi or Beaglebone and you’re good to go.

“To say ‘I don’t want to be filmed’ at a restaurant, at a party, or playing with your kids is perfectly OK. But how do you do that when you don’t even know if a device is recording?” writes artist Julian Oliver. “This steps up the game. It’s taking a jammer-like approach.”

The New Zealand born Oliver calls his program “Glassholes.sh.” It is capable of detecting a Glass device when it tries to connect to a WiFi network and then unceremoniously kicks it off the network.

Install Oliver’s program on a Raspberry Pi or Beaglebone mini-computer and plug it into a USB network antenna, and the gadget becomes a Google Glass detector, sniffing the local network for signs of Glass users. When it detects Glass, it uses the program Aircrack-NG to impersonate the network and send a “deauthorization” command, cutting the headset’s Wi-Fi connection. It can also emit a beep to signal the Glass-wearer’s presence to anyone nearby — Wired

Oliver developed the Glasshole.sh in response to people at art installations where he was presenting. That is, people with commercial interests who wouldn’t take “no” for an answer had to be kept at arm’s length.

So, is there a Glasshole nearby that’s surreptitiously recording video and/or pictures and then transmitting to the world? Yeah, find the Glasshole, automatically and discreetly, and cut off his WiFi…

What’s your take?


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